Tag Archives: memorial service

Advent 2: Joy in the midst of Uncertainty

The dawned filled with sunshine. My week has been filled with wonderful activities at the church, with some deep and meaningful family time and our house filled with laugher and love. Yesterday, December 8, we gathered to celebrate my mother-in-laws unique and unrepeatable life and spirit. She had died in early November, but this weekend allowed more of her grandchildren to make the trek to Wichita for her memorial service.

Traditionally the candle of joy is the third week of Advent. This week, at least personally, it seemed very appropriate. Joy can come sneaking around the corner or burst out in the most amazing times and events. My husband’s family here, created a joy filled space and time as memory board were made and stories shared and laughter and more laughter ringing through the rooms.

In the sermon Calm and Bright, from Marcia McFee’s Worship Design Studio, the 200th anniversary of the debut of Silent Night, Holy Night is celebrated. Verse two of that well known carol goes like this:

Silent Night, Holy Night,  Shepherds quake, at the sight                                                              Glories stream from heaven afar, Heavenly hosts sing “Alleluia”                                                 Christ, the Savior is born, Christ, the Savior is born.

When fear moves to awe and wonder, joy becomes part of the experience of the glories streaming and the alleluias being sung. In today’s service we focused on Elizabeth and Mary’s joy at being part of God’s grace being made real in their lives and through their participation in God’s work in the world. You can find today’s worship service in it’s entirety here.   

I am praying for new spaces and places to experience joy in this Advent Season.

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A Peculiar Pentecost

What an interesting few days it has been. I missed the first reports of the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas. I often try to stay away from e-mails, social media and news on Fridays. It is my day off, and doing something other sitting in front of the computer is what I usually do. I planted flowers, weeded the vegetable garden and generally attempted to not sit in front of a screen.

By the middle of the day I had checked in, saw the news and was dumbfounded. Again, I thought. Again? I turned away from the computer. I posted nothing, I had nothing else to comment on top of all the other comments.  Later that night I“` saw a twitter post from the Reverend Adam Hamilton, senior pastor of Church of the Resurrection in Kansas City. On Thursday night they hosted a high school graduation and there was a shooting in their parking lot. Good grief!

On Saturday morning I was up before dawn. The rest of the world was up for a royal wedding. I had no intention of watching, but my alarm goes off every morning at 5:45. Our local NPR station plays BBC Radio until 7:00 a.m. on Saturdays and 8:00 a.m. on Sundays. Well, of course it was all about the wedding. Right about 6:00 Andrew said to me, well should we get up and watch. We are awake. So we did.

Of course, the Royal wedding was everything it was expected to be. The dress and the bride were beautiful, the music heavenly, the liturgy properly dignified. This wedding though, was a brilliant mix of old world and new world, of African American Church and Anglican liturgy, of sacred and dignified moments and powerful and amazing preaching.

The Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church of American, the Most Reverend Michael Curry preached a moving, poignant, and powerful sermon on love. The full text of his sermon and a link to the video can be found here.

One can can criticize the scale of the wedding, or the shallowness of those who watched and are caught up in the romance of a mixed race woman from the United States marrying a British prince. I suppose one could even criticize the Bishop’s sermon as too long (fourteen minutes).

Me? I was captivated by Bishop Curry’s sermon. As I watched, it appeared his style made some uncomfortable, I have heard him preach in person, and it was toned down some without being fake. He truly preached consistent to his style, his ethics and his beliefs. I have to believe that was exactly what Meghan Markle wanted, along with a gospel choir. This spanned the ocean and the cultures of African American and British Caucasian.

This American Episcopal Bishop, an ancestor of slaves, preached love. Radical love. Powerful love. Life changing, world transforming love. Afterwards, what did people talk about? Love. God’s love for the whole world. In that sense, what is more “pentecostal” than that? People in different countries, with different faith expressions and understanding, in different languages talking about God and God’s love.

I mentioned all of that today in my sermon for Pentecost Sunday. We celebrated and honored our scholarship recipients and graduates. I quoted Bishop Curry and noted that Pentecost long ago took place in a world that was uncertain and violent. Yet God’s Spirit came with fire and wind to forever change lives and transform the world. You can watch the service here.

I am going to spend this week pondering that Pentecost Power and how God’s Spirit might make that love and grace real in my heart and spirit. May you experience that same Spirit as well.

 

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One year ago

The news is filled with pain and anger and violence in Ferguson, Missouri. While I can’t begin to understand the suffering and grief for many, I find myself distracted from those events from my own memories of this particular day. For me and my family, this is the day one year ago when we had my mother’s memorial service.

We gathered the week of Thanksgiving for the first time in years and years. Unfortunately my mother did not live long enough to celebrate with us, but we gathered in remembrance and in honor of her life. Here is the picture taken that day before her service.

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My brother wrote a eulogy to honor her unique life. Re-reading his eulogy made me smile and feel a little sad. I miss her. I am grateful for all foibles and her unique and unrepeatable spirit. Chris captured her well.

Postude

Sometimes the personal takes precedent over the political and global nature of life. This evening I am striving to just be at peace with memory, with grief, and with a sense that the world is always a bit unsettled, a bit crazy and all too violent. Tomorrow and the next day and the days after there will be time again to engage in all that the world offers and the hope and promise that faith gives. Tonight it is enough to say Thank You to the One who loves, who comforts and who offers grace enough to face whatever comes. With that prayer of gratitude, I am graced to serve.

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